Dialogue

Vocabulary

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VietnamesePod101.com Verified
Monday at 06:30 PM
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Hello! Hope you can now ask for medicines at a pharmacy. What cities have you visited so far?

VietnamesePod101.com Verified
Monday at 01:52 PM
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Hi Sammie,


Thanks for your question. You are correct: when saying “to have”, "có" is regularly used for objects, and "bị" is often used for pains or injuries.


For examples:

- I have a dog: Tôi có một chú chó.

- I have lots of money: Tôi có rất nhiều tiền :)

- I have stomache: Tôi bị đau bụng.

- I have a knee injury: Tôi bị đau đầu gối.


Please let us know if you have more questions, we'd love to assist you with any!


Cheers,


Khanh.

Team VietnamesePod101.com

Sammie
Sunday at 11:15 PM
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Tôi chưa đến thăm Việt Nam.


However, I have a question. What is the difference between "có" and "bị" when saying "to have"? Is có only for objects, and bị for pain?


Cảm ơn nhiều lắm!

Nick
Saturday at 09:36 AM
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Chào Giang,


I am pleased to hear this. I think I will fit right in when I visit :wink:


I very much enjoy the use of sarcasm, and I would be happy to tell you more about it. :smile:


Sarcasm in English is often identified by the tone of voice one uses. When in written communication, sarcasm can be harder to identify, but it is often based in exaggeration or by ascribing positive characteristics to things that are clearly not positive. This has evolved to include the use of emoticons to help provide "tone" and assist the reader in understanding. For example, if you said "No, Nick, your sentence was terrible" and I replied with "Thanks so much, Giang!" that would be a simple example of sarcasm.


If you have questions about this, I am happy to help :smile:


Hẹn gặp lại,

Giang

VietnamesePod101.com Verified
Wednesday at 11:29 AM
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Chào Nick


Sarcasm is also common in Vietnam. We tend to use sarcastic idiomatic phrases or proverbs.

But I don't know much about sarcasm in English. Could you give me some ideas on it?


Hẹn gặp lại,

Giang

Team VietnamesePod101.com

Nick
Friday at 02:22 AM
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Chào Giang,


Ah, I suppose you are right. I had started to get my hopes up and you go and knock them down again :disappointed:


Only kidding :wink: I know you were only trying to be honest. In English, sarcasm is one of the finer points of the language and I tend to use it quite frequently. Is sarcasm very common in Vietnamese?


Hẹn gặp lại,


Nick

VietnamesePod101.com Verified
Wednesday at 12:21 PM
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Chào Nick,


A professional writer may write well but may not speak well or remember well, so it cannot guarantee that he will be good at learning languages

Based on my experience, learning languages is all about how well you memorize and imitate. I think, being able to communicate well and convey exactly what you want to say is the most important for most foreign language learners, unless you want to study and master linguistics :smile:


Chào,

Giang

Team VietnamesePod101.com

Nick
Saturday at 03:00 AM
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Chào Giang,


Cảm ơn vì đã giúp tôi hiểu :smile:


For a moment, I thought I was going crazy :stuck_out_tongue_winking_eye: but then I remembered that there are many words in English like this. English can be even harder because the procunciation can change based on context but there are no tone marks to help you. You just have to memorize it.


I guess, if I can make money as a professional writer in English, I have a decent chance of mastering Vietnamese too, don't you think? :smile:


Hẹn gặp lại,


Nick

VietnamesePod101.com Verified
Friday at 01:32 PM
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Chào Nick,


You are right. Like in English, there are Vietnamese words which have the same spelling and pronunciation but different meanings in different contexts. "Cảm" is an example. It means "a cold" when you talk about your health/disease but it also means to "feel" or to "appreciate" (as in "cảm ơn").


I hope it is clear to you now.

Tạm biệt,

Giang

Team VietnamesePod101.com

Nick
Thursday at 02:19 AM
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Xin chào,


I have a question. In the vocabulary for this lesson, the word "cảm" is listed as meaning "a cold". In the very first lesson in this series, the same word "cảm" is used to mean "to feel", as in "cảm ơn" (literally, to feel obligation), which is used to say "thank you."


Is the meaning of this word defined by the context of the sentence? In English, we have many words that are spelled the same but mean different things based on context. I'm just trying to get a clearer understaning of the language.


Cảm ơn nhiều lắm,


Nick