Dialogue

Vocabulary

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11 Comments

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😄 😞 😳 😁 😒 😎 😠 😆 😅 😜 😉 😭 😇 😴 😮 😈 ❤️️ 👍

VietnamesePod101.com Verified
Monday at 06:30 PM
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Xin chào! How would you ask in Vietnamese for an internet cafe?

VietnamesePod101.com Verified
Wednesday at 12:16 PM
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Hi David,


Thanks for your comment and you're right: "Mật khẩu" means password and "nick" or "nickname" for username, however I would say young Vietnamese people often say "password" and "username" as these are very popular/ commonly used English words.


Let us know if there is any questions.


Sincerely,


Khanh

Team VietnamesePod101.com

David
Friday at 10:08 PM
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I've heard Mật khẩu for password and I think the word was Níck, for username.

VietnamesePod101.com Verified
Monday at 01:31 PM
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Hi Vic,


You are correct. While people in the north and in the south share the same writing, they have different accents and dialects in speaking. So yes, the Vietnamese word “dung” with the “d” sounding like the English letter “z” in Northern Viet Nam pronunciation and words starting with “d” sounded like they started with the English letter “y" in Southern Viet Nam pronunciation. Excellent observation!


Please let us know if you have further questions!


Cheers,


Khanh.

Team VietnamesePod101.com

Vic
Sunday at 05:43 AM
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I'm wondering about the Vietnamese word "dung" with the "d" sounding like the English letter "z". Is that perhaps a Northern Viet Nam pronunciation? I had previously learned that with Saigon dialect that words starting with "d" sounded like they started with the English letter "y". Is this correct?

VietnamesePod101.com Verified
Monday at 11:55 AM
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Hi Daniel Hong,


You're right. "d" is pronounced as "z" in English.

And thank you very much for your feedback.


Have a nice day,

Giang

Team VietnamesePod101.com

Daniel Hong
Friday at 01:56 AM
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Hi Giang,


Is the letter d (without the extra line through the stem) pronounced as the English letter z? Also, I found that having the written form of the words alongside the audioi lessons are very helpful.


Thank you,

Daniel Hong

VietnamesePod101.com Verified
Monday at 10:33 AM
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Hi Daniel,


You are very welcome.

If you have any other questions or concerns, please don't hesitate to let me know.


Have a nice day,

Giang

Team VietnamesePod101.com

Daniel Hong
Wednesday at 01:02 PM
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Hello Giang,


Thank you ever so much for clearing this matter up. I remember you did tell me that Vietnamese people like to be friendly rather than rigid formal.


Daniel Hong

VietnamesePod101.com Verified
Wednesday at 10:17 AM
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Hi Daniel,


The two words you mentioned are "sử dụng" and "dùng".

They basically have the same meaning, but "sử dụng" is more formal than "dùng"

For example, you can say: "cách dùng đũa" or "cách sử dụng đũa" (how to use chopsticks). "Cách dùng đũa" is more casual.


Please let me know if you need further explanation.

Best,

Giang

Team VietnamesePod101.com

Daniel Hong
Friday at 11:54 PM
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Hello Giang,


I am using your VietnamesePod101 app and says the Vietnamese for "to use" is "sự dung". Are there reasons why we use and don't use the additional "sự"?


Thank you,

Daniel Hong