Dialogue

Vocabulary

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8 Comments

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VietnamesePod101.com Verified
Monday at 06:30 PM
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Hello and welcome back! Do you face problems ordering at a restaurant?

aidriano
Tuesday at 12:52 PM
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Once again, the review audio bears little or no resemblance to what was explained in the lesson audio and notes!

VietnamesePod101.com Verified
Saturday at 09:58 PM
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Hi Steve,


Great to hear that you found this course suitable with you.

Please enjoy studying Vietnamese with us.


Cheers,

Giang

Team VietnamesePod101.com

Steve
Thursday at 12:42 AM
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A good course at just the right length to keep me going.:smile:

VietnamesePod101.com Verified
Thursday at 01:37 AM
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Hi Daniel,


Yes, it is more polite to add "Excuse me" (which is "Làm ơn cho hỏi" or "Xin hỏi") and it does make sense.

Anyway, most Vietnamese people don't add this, and they just call the waiter/waitress like: "Anh ơi" (for waiter) and "Chị ơi" (for waitress)

You can choose either way to ask them.


Cheers,

Giang

Team VietnamesePod101.com

Daniel Hong
Sunday at 12:33 AM
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Hello Giang,


Would it be more polite if I combined "Excuse me" with "waiter/waitress"? I am not sure if that sentence would make sense.


Thank you,

Daniel Hong

VietnamesePod101.com Verified
Saturday at 07:02 PM
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Hi Weng Fook,


Thank you very much for your comment.


"Thanh toán" literally means "to pay". Therefore, if the speaker wants to express that he/she pays for something, he/she can say "Tôi thanh toán tiền ăn". (Literally, I pay for the meal). This verb focuses on the action of "paying"


"Tính tiền" literally means "to calculate the money", so it means that you have to ask someone to "calculate the amount of money" you have spent first, then you'll pay. Therefore, it is frequently used when you ask for a check (because usually the waiter/waitress/seller will first tell you the amount then you pay).


That is the basic difference in meaning of these two words. But in daily conversation, "thanh toán" and "tính tiền" are used interchangeably when you want to ask for a check. In fact, Vietnamese people are not very strict in distinguishing these two words, so you can use them both and still be well understood. In addition, "tính tiền" is more informal.


Please let me know if this explanation does not sound clear to you.

Cheers,

Giang

Team VietnamesePod101.com

Weng Fook
Friday at 01:25 AM
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thanh toán


I was introduced to the following phrase


Tinh tien


Please provide some comment on the use of the above 2 phrases



Rgds

WF

:smile: